Twin Peaks: the original series

darkshadows38

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For example Harry isn't in Season 3 but in his place is his Cousin who's name i forget. i forget the name of the actor for both but the actor who played Harry i think is retired from acting and he decided not to come back.
 

Willie Oleson

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Not everything in TWIN PEAKS is about pushing the envelope.
My heart is bleeding for Sarah Palmer, and I'm feeling just as disappointed as Audrey Horne when Cooper says he's leaving soon.
At this point I feel I never want to leave at all and I want to keep all the characters with me. I could live on coffee and cherry pie, and occasionally being spooked by a big nasty owl.

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Young Ben
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It's strange to think that Richard Beymer also played the lacklustre fashion designer in the lukewarm soap opera PAPER DOLLS. He's so very entertaining as the conniving Ben Horne.

Peggy Lipton is the epitome of All American beauty
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and she suffers gracefully in her role of Norma Jennings. She doesn't actually cook or bake anything. Everything on the menu just magically appears in front of the customers. That's why she always looks so fresh and glamorous. Maybe she's also Krystle Jennings' half-sister. The sisterhood of beautiful women.

But look! Something intriguing and unexpected has happened: Andrew Packard isn't dead at all! He and his dastardly sister have been plotting something!:a2:
 

darkshadows38

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hell Richard Beymer was in West Side Story (1961) he was Tony! season 1 many consider a better season and i can see why but i also love Season 2 as well. Season 3 for me isn't as good i haven't seen it all and it does pick up where Season 2 left off actually. but if i recall Seasons 1 and 2 only had #29 episodes if i recall i think Season 3 had 18 episodes if i recall
 

Willie Oleson

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season 1 many consider a better season
Well the big mystery has been solved but overall I see no difference in quality. And the more I see about the characters the more I love them. (Ed, Nadine and Andy are my least favourite characters but they're not unwatchable or anything like that).

The future X-files agent (how could it not be) plays a pretty woman with great hair.

And then there's handsome James, always brooding about something
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And together they are TWIN PEAKS. It's not just about the mystery.
 

darkshadows38

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1. David Lynch and Mark Frost were pretty much Forced to do that reveal in season 1 wasn't it? or was it Season 2? i forget anymore The Network were the ones who forced them to reveal who the killer was they Originally wasn't even going to ever say who it was? 2. check out the Story our Fox Mulder David D. said about his time his father was in the hospital and he went to visit him in it. it was during the time well that Twin Peaks was on and that he was playing Denise it's funny as hell
 

Willie Oleson

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The strangest thing has happened. When Denise appeared as Dennis he still looked like Denise.
There's a guest role for future SAVANNAH star Robyn Lively (she's married to HYPERION BAY star Bart Johnson, I think he played a "Leo Johnson" character who was married to Trudy Carson, played by former ANGEL FALLS star Cassidy Rae).
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Plenty of romance and character development, and even characters we don't see very often get some great scenes, like Bobby's mother Betty.
Jean Renault is dead, I'm going to miss his soft-spoken voice with the French-Canadian accent.

James has left Twin Peaks and now he's in a situation that reminds me of Falcon Crest season 9 but also Lee Webber and Adrienne van Leyden in Peyton Place.
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Don't hurt my baby, he must come back in season 3!
 

darkshadows38

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i don't remember if he's in season 3 to be honest. Everette McGill came out retirement to do season 3. and some of them only did bit parts like 1 or two episodes. David Lynch does retired as Gordon though & Miguel Ferror does come back as well. which i spelled his last name wrong dammit. it was the last acting job i think he did before he died i think?
 

the-lost-son

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Twin peaks was a very, very welcome breath of fresh air. TV productions in late 80s/early 90s were despondent, repetitive, crestfallen, not smart, in my opinion very bad. These years are the worst in regards to TV imo.

All the Primetime soaps are out of steam, detoriated to cheapest daytime soaps. The rest are sitcoms (Roseanne, Cosby... and the likes) or other self-contained series (Murder she wrote).

They all have in common that you didn't need to bother to watch every episode. It was brainless entertainment, TV degraded to its intelligently lowest form.

And then there is Twin peaks where you had to observe closely, to ponder about the weird stuff, to remember what happened a few episodes earlier.
I watched it once, enjoyed it. I'm not a keen fan but I'm very grateful that this series changed the TV landscape completely, had an influence on so many series and rescued us out of this orcus.
 
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darkshadows38

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honestly i do not remember it even being on the air cause i never watched it until like (1996) i think it was? have you seen People under the stairs? (1991) One of my favorite horror films it's got both Big Ed and his wife. they play the villains!
 

Willie Oleson

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Yippee, I also discovered a DALLAS connection.
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(to be honest, I had to check IMDB because I wasn't sure that she wasn't Jill Eikenberry).
I think she's Twin Peaks' answer to Pamela Lynch.

Josie "belongs" to a Very Important And Sinister Man - that reminds me of Lane Ballou's predicament in FLAMINGO ROAD.

Two significant villains have arrived in Twin Peaks: Thomas Eckhardt and Windom Earle. Dale Cooper compares his former FBI partner with a diamond: hard and brilliant.
It's not unusual to introduce villains that way, but Dale's deadpan delivery has a whiff of satire - although it's hard to explain exactly why. Or maybe it just sounds a little out of place in Harry Truman's office.

The Fire Walk With Me DVD has arrived! I've only watched it once so I'm very excited about it.

have you seen People under the stairs?
As a matter of fact, I have!
 

darkshadows38

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Fire walks with me (1992) is a decent picture a lot of the shit was cut and it makes the film make even less sense than if they had left a lot more in!
 

Willie Oleson

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Annie are you walking, are you walking Annie?

And that's the end of 90s Twin Peaks.
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Well, technically, 26 years. However it's very possible that this episode aired in 1992 in overseas countries.
I could do something funny and pretend it's still 1992 and then step into the future of Twin Peaks 2017.

About season 2: the murder mystery was solved and apparently a lot of viewers tuned out after that. I suspect that those viewers didn't like it very much to begin with.
After all, this was something that didn't compare to anything else previously shown on television. Perhaps this point in the story was the perfect excuse to abandon this most curious novelty.
But season 1 wasn't about Laura's death, it was about her life. She was the main character of the show and we fell in love with her, and the more horrific the details of her life unraveled the more we loved her. It's a strange process but somehow you become one of them.

I don't think the revelation of the killer was the game changer, it was the idea that in that moment Laura really died.
Pressure from behind-the-scenes and a prima donna attitude from one of the actors had played a part in the change of the intended narrative (if we have to believe the various sources) and it's kinda funny that a story that parodies the soap genre falls into the trappings of said genre i.e. sub-plots that isolate the characters and a plethora of new characters just keep the story going.
From that point of view I can understand the negative response to season 2.
But the quality of the production and the excellent performances remained intact, and with the exception of John Justice Wheeler, all new characters added something peculiar or funny to the story (imho).
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I loved the fashion show and all the mayhem caused by the pine weasel.
Windom Earle is the overarching soap trope villain that reconnects the characters, just like Michael Tyrone and Sean Rowan had done before him. But he's very, very good.

The mix of subtle parody, surrealism and some serious horror had become of a new genre of its own. The casting, lyrical scripts and breathtaking cinematography was the cherry on the cherry pie, it's almost unbelievable that this was made in 1990. Maybe it wasn't!
As for finding explanations and meanings and connecting the dots - that doesn't interest me very much. Twin Peaks is often more about the experience than the narrative, and that's why season 2 still works for me. I never thought I was going to say this, but...poor Leo! What an ordeal!

Andz..now..I'm..giong..to..hhh-watch..thez..mievo..Fire Walk With Me.
 

James from London

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it's kinda funny that a story that parodies the soap genre falls into the trappings of said genre i.e. sub-plots that isolate the characters and a plethora of new characters just keep the story going.
It's well over five years since I watched the original series so my opinion of it has officially expired, but this was pretty much my problem with Season 2 after Leland was gone.

I've just finished watching the second season of BROADCHURCH, which reminded me of this season of TWIN PEAKS in a way. The first season -- a murder mystery in a small town where everyone's a suspect with a secret and the investigating detective is an eccentric outsider -- came out in 2013 and was a huge hit, but I only got around to watching it during lockdown last year. I knew that the second season hadn't been nearly as well received so I adjusted my expectations accordingly.

In a way, the problems are similar to those in TP: once the mystery has been solved and the killer revealed, you're left a town full of characters with not much to do. So like TWIN PEAKS, BROADCHURCH comes up with a replacement (but not quite as compelling) mystery where the eccentric detective is forced to confront an unresolved case from his past that has haunted him ever since. However, as BROADCHURCH has much shorter seasons han TP (eight episodes) , there's kind of too much going on rather than too little. The murder trial resulting from the first season is also an ongoing storyline, plus you've got big name guest stars who need storylines of their own even if they don't have much to do with anything (e.g. Charlotte Rampling as a prosecuting lawyer who is secretly going blind, secretly in love with the woman who runs the local newspaper and has an elderly mother whose care she secretly can't afford to pay for). But clunky as it sometimes was, I was still emotionally invested enough to stick with it.
As for finding explanations and meanings and connecting the dots - that doesn't interest me very much. Twin Peaks is often more about the experience than the narrative, and that's why season 2 still works for me.
Season 3 is very much experience over narrative, and I absolutely loved it.
Andz..now..I'm..giong..to..hhh-watch..thez..mievo..Fire Walk With Me.
Great! Fire Walk With Me is so good.
 

Willie Oleson

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I suspect that those viewers didn't like it very much to begin with.
Actually....I was one of them. Like many other viewers I had not expected to see anything like this and I assumed it would be a straightforward prime time soap opera. My mother even suggested that it could be a modern version of Peyton Place which, at that time, was still the Holy Grail on my soaps-to-watch-list.
I loved the look and the sound of Twin Peaks but apart from that I just didn't know what to do with it.

Nevertheless, that didn't stop me from buying the DVD as soon as it came out. Maybe the Twin Peaks vibe had started to sink in over the years, and maybe subconsciously and retroactively I had developed some appreciation for this very alternative nighttime drama.
When I rewatched season 2 for the first time I was genuinely surprised to find out that I had already watched the post-murder mystery episodes.
The way I remembered it was "Leland dunnit, thank God it's over!"
Either way, knowing what it was, I found it much easier to enjoy the series, but still not as much as this second rewatch.
There are so many wonderful details (I don't mean clues or anything revealing) and even the weaker middle part of season 2 provided enough seductiveness and foggy nostalgia to me.
And I'd rather watch James Hurley in a corny sub-plot than NO James at all.

Sheriff Truman to Cooper, looking at the mask of Caroline on his desk: "she really was a beautiful woman".
Is it genuine or hilarious? I just love the ongoing double entendre in the Twin Peaks scripts. Nobody can tell for a fact how it's supposed to be interpreted.
But that's also what made the full-on-goofiness of characters like Andy, Lucy and Nadine less interesting or funny in season 2.

actually it is 25 years cause Season 3 was i think filmed in (2016) i believe and so it was 25 years
I'm going to disagree because it doesn't mean anything if we can't watch it :p
In a way, the problems are similar to those in TP: once the mystery has been solved and the killer revealed, you're left a town full of characters with not much to do
That was the reason I never bothered with season 2.
(e.g. Charlotte Rampling as a prosecuting lawyer who is secretly going blind, secretly in love with the woman who runs the local newspaper and has an elderly mother whose care she secretly can't afford to pay for)
It seems to me they were trying a little too hard to be secretive about, well, pretty much everything.
But....Charlotte Rampling. I didn't know she was in it too.
 

darkshadows38

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true but filming wise between when season 2 ended and season 3 started it was 25 years so that line became more true as time went on. i love both seasons 1 and 2 i don't own season 3 nor have i seen it all but i could not get into it like i did with the 1st two seasons. at some point i do plan on getting the show on bluray the entire series but who knows when? I dunno
 
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